Thinking Trust for Your Estate? Think Legal

While it may not be the right fit for every retiree, a trust is an effective and efficient estate planning tool in certain situations. For example, if you have young grandchildren that you want to leave money for, but you want to control how and when it can be used after you’re gone, then a trust might be the way to go. Or maybe you want to make sure your estate funds go towards a particular cause or entity, in which case a trust can control that. Regardless of your purpose for the trust, it’s important that it is set up properly, which the vast majority of times involves working with an attorney specializing in that area. Trusts are complex devices that, if not created properly, can lead to confusion and eventual frustration for family, friends, and/or organizations that may have expected to benefit from the funds. If you are considering a trust for your estate or for retirement, I strongly urge you to speak to an attorney about it. Not only that, but I encourage you to take the time to find an attorney that you are comfortable with discussing any matters related to your personal trust with. Finding the right attorney can make all the difference and a good one should be able to help you reach your desired goals or be frank with you about the feasibility of your plans. Along with talking with an attorney, you may also want to speak with a wealth manager or financial planner to further discuss your retirement plans as well as your estate plans. These conversations can go a long way towards helping you reach the desired end point for you and your money.

It All Starts With a Nest

You can’t plan for retirement without first thinking about the money you will be spending in retirement. Thus, your retirement planning–and everything that follows those initial plans–will focus on your nest egg. How you build that nest egg will have a monumental impact on what you can do when you actually most into your post-career life. If you take aggressive steps and keep on top of your nest egg, then you will probably have a good chunk of money ready for when you stop working. On the flip side, if you don’t take steps to properly build up a nest egg or make bad decisions when doing so, then you probably won’t have much flexibility in retirement or may have to work longer than intended to meet your goals. No matter how you slice it, your nest egg is essential to your retirement plans. Now, if your nest egg isn’t quite where you want to it be right now, don’t fret. You can always take steps to get back on track and then determine what’s realistic from there. There is no on-size-fits-all answer for that, but some steps would include re-evaluating your retirement goals, analyzing your portfolio and/or investment decisions, or working with a financial planner or wealth manager to really kick your saving into gear. Each person’s situation is unique regarding how much they need to save for retirement, so some may have a lot of work to do while others may be right on track. What’s key, no matter where you are in your saving journey, is that you never lose track of your nest egg and that you focus on building it up as much as possible. So, how big is your nest egg?

Don’t Let the Election Impact Your Portfolio

Featured

I believe I wrote about this a number of months ago as the election season was starting to ramp up, but I feel the need to mention it again: Don’t let politics drive your portfolio decisions. In the weeks leading up to the election, it can be easy to get caught up in the theories and predictions about what might happen if a particular candidate wins or a certain party gains power. Some will take those predictions and make portfolio decisions in the hopes of getting ahead of the curve regarding how the markets might react to certain administrations. First off, it is incredibly difficult to predict how the markets will react to elections. What economic pundits predicted at the start of the past two administrations did not come to pass with the markets performing much stronger than expected. Rather, you should make your portfolio as you normally would and ignore the election when doing so. Don’t give you portfolio any special treatment between now and Nov. 3. That can be hard to do, especially with the news cycle (and social media and conversations with friends) being filled with election talk, it won’t be easy. However, trust me, it will be worth it to keep your portfolio on the same road it’s be going on.

Struggling With Retirement Saving? You’re Not Alone.

Featured

It’s well known within the retirement planning industry that about half of all Americans are having a tough time with their retirement finances. That’s a lot of people. Furthermore, uncertain economic times can push the number of those struggling north of 50%. Considering how many retirees are out there–and it’s impressive due to one of the largest demographics reaching retirement age (*cough* Baby Boomers *cough*) as we speak–that’s a lot of Americans struggling to either save for retirement or stretch out their finances in retirement. With all that said, I want to remind you that you are not alone if you are struggling to either save or make your nest egg last. Many people do and there’s nothing wrong with asking for help in doing so. If you can afford it, a good wealth manager or financial planner can be a huge help. Despite the tone some of my blogposts, I fully understand that saving for retirement is no easy task and it’s been particularly tough over the past 15 years or so. That doesn’t mean you should give up on it, though. In fact, I want to encourage you to save as much as you can and to take steps to maximize your saving, regardless of where you are in your life. Something is better than nothing. So, are you struggling with saving for retirement? You’re not alone, but what are you going to do about it?

When to Get Serious About Retirement

Featured

Retirement can seem like a long ways off as you make your way through your career–and, of course, life–during your 20s, 30s, and 40s. However, when you get into your 50s, suddenly it might not seem so far off in the distance. Your early 50s, in particular, are a really good time to get serious about retirement. What does it mean to “get serious” about retirement? It means sitting down and taking a long, hard look at where your finances stand and when exactly you want to retire. You will also want to reassess your retirement goals and get a good understanding of what life in retirement will be like. What will your retirement budget be? Do you plan on paying down your debt before retiring? Are you going to move for retirement? These are some important questions you will need to ask yourself as you near retirement age. The answers may surprise you and will give you a good sense of what is realistic regarding retirement. Now, I’m not saying you need to wait until your 50s to get serious about retirement (the earlier you start, the better), but I am encouraging you to not wait until your late 50s/early 60s to start thinking about your post-work life. Remember, retirement is serious business that requires a plan and hard work, both before and during. Taking the time to properly prepare for it so that you can enjoy it is very important. So, are you ready for retirement?

Personal Finance is More Than Just Saving. It’s Spending Too!

A majority of the time, personal finance conversations/blog posts/podcasts center around saving. When spending money gets talked about, usually it has to do with paying down debts or making necessary purchase, such as homes or cars. However, it’s important to remember that finance is more than just saving for retirement or to own a home. It’s more than just worrying about debts. Spending is an important part of personal finance as well. Now, I’m not encouraging you to go out and spend like it’s going out of style. What I am encouraging you to do is to be smart with your money and to spend on things that are important to you. Is there a hobby that keeps you active and happy? Don’t be afraid to spend a bit on it. Of course–I’ll reiterate–don’t spend obscene amounts on it, but a few dollars here and there won’t hurt. Being happy and active can go a long way in life and is just as important to your well being as how much money you save. Spending can also be helpful in other ways, such as helping you to build credit, if you are a young saver. Having strong credit can help you down the road when you apply for car loans or mortgages by helping you to secure a favorable rate. The key though is that you don’t get too caught up in saving as you march towards retirement. Yes, you should of course work to meet your retirement saving goals and should save enough live comfortably after you stop working. However, you shouldn’t be afraid to spend a little on yourself. Don’t be afraid to plan a vacation from time to time or buy yourself that new piece to tech to make your life a little more efficient. So what will you spend money on?

An IRA Loan? Yea, Don’t Do That.

Featured

It can be tempting to look at your nest egg and see an untapped source of money, particularly if your nest egg is sizeable and you are nearing retirement. For example, maybe you found your dream retirement home and need money for a down payment. You may look to your IRA for a short-term loan to meet those money requirements. I’m here to tell you that that is a bad idea and to discourage you not to do so. The biggest reason being that you don’t want to tap into your IRA monies until you actually retire and, even then, you will want to have a plan for doing so. You’ve worked hard to save up for your post-work life and you want to make sure that money goes towards your retirement goals (of course, if purchasing a retirement home is part of your plan, then that’s a different discussion). The other risk of viewing your IRA as a loan source is the risk of making a mistake when taking out money. Keep in mind that there are two routes you can go when taking money out of your IRA before reaching retirement age. First off, you can take a distribution, pay the taxes and penalties, and then not have to worry about what you do with the money. The other option is to take out the money and do a 60 day rollover, which will involve paying back the money within that 60 day window. There’s a lot of risk involved with that. I repeat, there is a lot of risk involved with doing this. Mainly, if you take out the money, is there any guarantee that you will recoup it within that 60 day window? Chances are, you are going to be making a large purchase if you need a loan (probably talking thousands of dollars), so what are the chances that you will make that money back in two months? If you are certain that you can do that, then maybe you can consider it. However, if you aren’t so sure that you can complete such a transaction in that timeframe, stay away from this idea. That can lead to a lot of problems if you aren’t able to put the money back within those 60-days. Hint: Don’t open yourself up to the IRS taking more of your money through penalties! If you are in need of money, you should consider other types of loans or selling off other assets before even considering your IRA as a loan source. You may even want to really think about whether you even need to make the purchase at that time and whether you can put it off until you actually have the funds and leave your retirement money alone.

COVID Has Exposed Our Retirement Problem

Featured

It may not be obvious, but we have a retirement problem in this country and the economic crisis created by the efforts to combat COVID have exposed it. Not enough people have enough saved for retirement. The economic conditions that began back in the early Spring have forced many older workers into forced retirements that they were not fully prepared for. For those younger workers who suddenly found themselves on unemployment, there aren’t enough jobs that offer strong retirement benefits or high enough wages to allow them to look beyond the survival necessities (i.e. rent, food, gas, etc.). Demographics and class also play a role in whether people have the opportunities to save for retirement. While there are a lot of tools available today for anyone to save for retirement, the tools are not the issue. The issue is that fewer people have wiggle room financially to save enough for retirement. Most people with hefty retirement accounts either had jobs that paid well or spent years working for big companies that offered strong benefits. For many in the gig economy or working for small businesses, the opportunities to save and the benefits of things like matching contributions or stock ownership plans are just not there. And yes, there are more working in the gig economy or small businesses than many of us realize. So what’s the solution? Well, there was recent legislation passed that makes it much easier for small businesses to band together and offer retirement benefits as well as pushes back the age for requirement minimum distributions (RMDs). However, we may need to have a larger discussion about how we go about saving for retirement after these current economic conditions improve, particularly about pay and the cost of living in this country. There may also need to be further reform of the tools that we have, making them easier to use and understand. We will see what the future brings regarding all this.

Getting Your Kids in the Investing Game

Featured

You’ve probably heard me say on this blog that the best way to save for retirement is to start early. The same goes for investing. One of the best ways to teach your kids about the stock market and get them thinking about their financial future is by allowing them to invest in the markets. Many of the major investment platforms offer custodial accounts, which allow parents to set up trading accounts for children under 18 and which require adult permission to complete transactions. Once you have the account, you can decide how to best teach your teenager the importance of risk and investing. If you have more than one teenager involved, maybe make a game out of it and see whose investments perform the best over a set amount of time. If your teenager is more goal oriented, maybe encourage them to use the account as a way to grow money for something like a car or product they want. Whatever you choose to do, be sure to guide them and set some limits. You may want to limit what investments they can put money into (no options, etc.). You will also want to encourage them to use properly vetted resources, such as popular investment books or well-sourced blogs. Heck, you yourself may want to use it as an opportunity to read back up on the latest investing trends and advice out there, if you haven’t already. Of course, you will also want to teach your children about risk as they will most likely experience some loss. It may be hard for them at first, but if you encourage them to be patient and learn from why the investment went down, then it will be a good thing in the long run. Just make sure they don’t lose too much, or for that matter, gain too much without learning about trends and why their investment performed the way it did. With the right guidance and some sound advice, your children can learn about the stock market and hopefully set themselves up for a solid financial future. What did you wish your parents taught you about investing growing up?

Change Is a Good Thing

Featured

“Change is the only constant.” You’ve probably heard this expression before. I believe it is sometimes attributed to the Greek philosopher Heraclitus, but it gets used often as a business mantra or by people who are seemingly always in motion. It’s also a reminder that despite our best efforts at times, change happens. I’ll admit, change can be scary, but it can also be a wonderful thing. It can force us to reflect on where we are and where we want to go. It can also provide us with an opportunity to try new things and make decisions that we have been putting off. For example, changes in the markets can force you to re-evaluate your investments and portfolio (did you really think I wasn’t going to tie this back to investing or retirement planning some way? lol.). That can be a really good thing. Markets are prone to change as companies come and go and stocks trend up and down. As such, you will need to buy and sell investments from time to time, especially if you are investing for the long-term. Same goes for your retirement planning. Over time, your benchmarks and goals will change and you will need to act accordingly. Yes, it can be a bit scary to think about having to pivot your retirement saving plan, but it can also be exciting. It can be refreshing to have a new interest or goal that fits with what you want more than what you currently have. It really all depends on how you look at it. Change can be a wonderful thing, are you ready for it when it eventually comes?