Ignore the Markets; Stay Invested

One of the worst things you can do when the market takes a dip (or a dive) is to immediately pull your money out. While it may seem logical–why lose any more money–it’s almost always the wrong move. Taking money out during a downturn makes it incredibly difficult to take advantage of the eventual upturn. If you understand the tax implications of losses, you further take advantage through smart tax harvesting (I’m not going to get into that here). Now, I’m not talking about divesting your money in one stock and investing it in another that you think is poised Continue reading Ignore the Markets; Stay Invested

Having Money and Properly Managing It are Two Different Things

Just because you have lots of money doesn’t mean you’re necessarily a financial wizard. Society is littered with famous celebrities who have squandered massive amounts of money through various means, such as bad investments or poor spending habits. I’m not saying we need to be sympathetic to celebrities who make millions, but their stories, when looked at together, can provide an important lesson for all of us. That is, that having money and being able to properly manage it and care for it are two different things. In other words, just because you have money doesn’t mean you will know Continue reading Having Money and Properly Managing It are Two Different Things

Scratching a “Risk” Itch

As I’ve mentioned in the past, investing can be a great way to grow your nest egg. With a good understanding of your risk appetite and your goals–both long-term and short-term–you can make investment decisions that can put your money to work for you. However, making cautious investment decisions can seem boring at times, especially making decisions regarding long-term goals (i.e. saving for retirement while decades away). It can also be tempting at times to play with the markets a bit and experiment with taking on a little more risk than you normally do. Now, I’m not suggesting you risk Continue reading Scratching a “Risk” Itch

Handling the Bear

Whether you or certain pundits want to acknowledge it or not, we are in a bear market at a moment. What does that mean? It means the markets have fallen–for an official bear market the prices need to fall at least 20%–and investor sentiment reflects that downturn. You’re probably familiar with the term and understand it to be the opposite of a bull market, which is what we were in up until early March. In short, a bull market means things are on an upswing. A bear market is tough to stomach, particularly when it’s not clear when exactly things Continue reading Handling the Bear

Outsmart the Markets? You’ll Just Look Dumb

Many Americans use the stock market–and other investment markets–as a way to build up their nest eggs over the long-term. After all, well thought-out investments in steady, low-risk annuities or mutual funds can produce quite a return over a long period of time, such as multiple decades. However, not all Americans have the discipline and patience to make such long-term investments. It’s not uncommon for some to attempt to outsmart the markets by either trying to predict what an investment will do next or by making risky investments that they hope will payoff in the short-term. This rarely, if ever, Continue reading Outsmart the Markets? You’ll Just Look Dumb

A Bullish Stock Market Doesn’t Equal Retirement Riches

It’s been over a decade since the stock market hit the lowest point of the recession in 2009. Since then, it’s done nothing but seemingly improve. After a decade of seemingly (key word here) bullish activity, one would think that a lot of investment portfolios and retirement accounts would be reaping the benefits, but that’s not necessarily true. In fact, the majority of Americans will still struggle to save enough for retirement. The biggest reason? The majority of stocks are still owned by the richest few Americans. While many Americans were able to bolster their nest eggs by investing during Continue reading A Bullish Stock Market Doesn’t Equal Retirement Riches

The Unpredictability of Investing

It’s easy to judge an investment in hindsight. What’s hard to do is to predict what will happen with an investment when you purchase it. If it’s stock, who knows how the company will perform over the long run? Will it’s products or services remain relevant? Will ownership continue to innovate? If you have invested in property (i.e. land or a building), will the improvements you make upon it work out? If you plan on renting it out, the rental market in the area remain strong or end up weak? These are unpredictable things that create risk with every investment. Continue reading The Unpredictability of Investing