Not All Recharacterizations Have Gone Away

You may recall that the ability to recharacterize a Roth IRA conversion went away as part of the tax cut that passed in 2017. It wasn’t a major sticking point of the legislation, but it did create some concern about how it could affect those saving for retirement. However, I want to remind you that only recharacterization of Roth IRA conversions went away and that the ability to recharacterize other types of transactions still remains a possibility. For example, if you made a Roth IRA contribution but did not realize that you were above the income threshold to do so, Continue reading Not All Recharacterizations Have Gone Away

Have You Thought About a Roth Conversion?

With the stock market appearing to head towards a–dare I say it–recession, now might seem like an odd time to talk about converting your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. However, converting when the markets are low actually might be the best time to do so. When it comes to Roth IRA conversions, the tax bill for doing so is based on the value of your traditional IRA assets. Thus, when the markets are down, there’s a really good chance your IRA assets are down too, which means a lower tax number. As for the actual tax hit, as you Continue reading Have You Thought About a Roth Conversion?

Be Sure to Keep Inherited IRAs and Your Own IRAs Separated

If you have more than one IRA, you can aggregate the required minimum distributions (RMDs) and take them from one IRA. Most IRA owners are familiar with this allowance. However, not everyone is aware of that fact that you cannot include inherited IRAs as part of that aggregation. It can be easy to overlook. It should be noted though, that if you inherited multiple IRAs of the same type (Roth vs. traditional) from the same person, you can aggregate the RMDs from those. In short, if you have multiple IRAs, one of which is an inherited IRA, you will need Continue reading Be Sure to Keep Inherited IRAs and Your Own IRAs Separated

Small Business Owner? Don’t Forgo Retirement Saving

If you are a freelancer or small business owner, you probably have a lot to worry about when it comes to your work or business. You have expenses to track, work to do, clients to satisfy, and maybe an employee or two to oversee. With all that, it can be easy to forget about saving for retirement. Not only that, but you don’t have the reminders regarding opening a retirement account or automatic retirement account enrollment that are standards in larger business and corporations. Thus, it’s imperative that you take it upon yourself to think about and take the required Continue reading Small Business Owner? Don’t Forgo Retirement Saving

The Cautions of Backdoor Roth IRA Conversions

A backdoor Roth IRA conversion can be tempting if you are considering retiring early and are currently over the income limits for a Roth IRA contribution. In case you are unfamiliar, a backdoor Roth IRA conversion is where you contribute money to a traditional IRA and then convert that money into a Roth IRA. This is a useful transaction for those who earn too much income to contribute to a Roth IRA as Traditional IRAs have no income limits. It’s also a perfectly legal transaction. However, when doing a backdoor conversion, keep in mind that the taxman will get his Continue reading The Cautions of Backdoor Roth IRA Conversions

The Best Way to Avoid Rollover Complications

Do you want to know a little financial secret on how to avoid rollover headaches? It’s simple, don’t do them! I’m not kidding. Rollovers, especially 60-day rollovers, can be complex as there are limitations on how many you can do each year and how long you have to move the funds. If you don’t read up on the rules or track the time between when the funds are disbursed to when they must go back into an account, you and your retirement funds could be in for a world of hurt. And yes, there are ways to avoid a rollover Continue reading The Best Way to Avoid Rollover Complications

Maximizing on Multiple Roth Accounts

It’s not uncommon for retirees to have more than one retirement account. Usually it’s a result of having worked at multiple employers throughout the course of a career and having opened a retirement account at each place of employment. If you do have more than one retirement account, don’t worry as there’s nothing wrong with that. You may want to consider consolidating similar accounts as you near or enter retirement, but that’s a discussion for another post. If you do have multiple accounts–especially more than one Roth-type account–you may want to make sure that you are maximizing your contributions to Continue reading Maximizing on Multiple Roth Accounts