Take Advantage of That Delayed IRA Contribution Deadline

Have you made an IRA contribution for 2019 yet? Are you worried that you might not get the chance to? Well, there is good news. While you probably heard that the IRS extended the deadline for filing taxes to July 31, you probably did not know that the deadline for making a prior year contribution was pushed back to July 15. That’s three extra months! That might not seem like a big deal, but it could be for many Americans who didn’t get to make a contribution for 2019. If you didn’t get to make a contribution–and of course have Continue reading Take Advantage of That Delayed IRA Contribution Deadline

Money In, Money Out: The SECURE Act and Age Restriction Changes

If you’ve been reading up on the SECURE Act, then you are probably well aware of the fact that it eliminated the age restriction on contributions to traditional IRAs. This is a big deal for those Americans planning to work into their 70s by allowing them to put money into their traditional IRAs while they continue working. It should be noted, though, that removal of the age restriction does not remove required minimum distribution (RMD) age requirements. That means that people will still need to begin taking RMDs from a traditional IRA at 72, even as they are still making Continue reading Money In, Money Out: The SECURE Act and Age Restriction Changes

The SECURE Act Passed. What Does That Mean?

I’ve written about the SECURE (Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement) Act a number of times over the past year or so. I’m writing now following it’s passing Congress last week as part of the year-end spending bill. Now that President Trump has signed it into law, it goes into effect on January 1, 2020. The legislation is a relatively large overhaul to retirement savings accounts. The two biggest changes are to contributions and required minimum distributions (RMDs). First off, the new law eliminates the age limit for traditional IRA contributions. This means that if you are still working, Continue reading The SECURE Act Passed. What Does That Mean?

Finance Themed Gifts or the Holidays

We’re a little less than 10 days away from Christmas, so chances are, you’ve probably done all your holiday shopping at this point. However, if you’re looking for a few more gift ideas for your children or grandchildren, then maybe you might want to consider something with a focus on finances and money. For example, a book on personal finance can be a great gift that can help people more than they may even realize. There are many such books out there covering various aspects of personal finance, so you may want to stick with bestsellers on this. A personal Continue reading Finance Themed Gifts or the Holidays

Don’t Forget The IRA Contribution Correction Deadline!

Did you make an IRA contribution only to later find out that your were not eligible to make that contribution? Or maybe you made a contribution and later decided that you wanted to use that money elsewhere? Whatever the reason, just know that you can essentially take back a Roth IRA or Traditional IRA contribution, provided you file the paperwork for doing so on time. The deadline for correcting an IRA contribution is October 15 of the year after you made the contribution. That might seem like a random deadline, but I can assure you it is not. It’s exactly Continue reading Don’t Forget The IRA Contribution Correction Deadline!

The Cautions of Backdoor Roth IRA Conversions

A backdoor Roth IRA conversion can be tempting if you are considering retiring early and are currently over the income limits for a Roth IRA contribution. In case you are unfamiliar, a backdoor Roth IRA conversion is where you contribute money to a traditional IRA and then convert that money into a Roth IRA. This is a useful transaction for those who earn too much income to contribute to a Roth IRA as Traditional IRAs have no income limits. It’s also a perfectly legal transaction. However, when doing a backdoor conversion, keep in mind that the taxman will get his Continue reading The Cautions of Backdoor Roth IRA Conversions

You Don’t Need Income to Make an IRA Contribution

Contrary to what you may think, you don’t need to earn income to be able to make contributions to an IRA. You’re probably familiar with spousal contributions, but did you know that you can make contributions from when you exercise non-qualified stock options? The taxable portion is considered taxable income for IRA purposes. If you receive alimony, that too is taxable as ordinary income and is eligible for IRA contribution. Some scholarships and fellowships may be considered taxable income, depending on reported on the W-2 form. This last one can be valuable to young savers, such as your children or Continue reading You Don’t Need Income to Make an IRA Contribution

Is Your Spouse Still Working? Have Them Make a Contribution!

Did you know that if you retire, but your spouse continues to work, that you can still make a spousal contribution to an IRA? And no, you do not need to open another account to start making such contributions. So long as your spouse earns enough income to cover the 2019 contribution limits for the both of you, a spousal contribution to your own Roth IRA can be made. It doesn’t matter who the money comes from–it could be written by you or your spouse–you just need to file a joint federal tax return and your spouse needs to meet Continue reading Is Your Spouse Still Working? Have Them Make a Contribution!

Don’t Miss Out on a 2018 IRA Contribution

You may not realize it, but you still have time to make a contribution to your IRA and still have it count for 2018. Whether it’s a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, you have until tax day to make a contribution for the previous year. Thus, you can make a contribution anytime before April 15, 2019, and have it count as though it was made in 2018. Many people don’t realize that such an opportunity exists. However, keep in mind that the April 15 deadline is a hard deadline, which means there is no ability to extend it, unlike Continue reading Don’t Miss Out on a 2018 IRA Contribution